Project Description

SEYÐISFJÖRÐUR

HOW TO GET THERE

GPS: 65.2622409,-14.0179538

DIRECTIONS

The long and deep fjord of Seydisfjordur reaches 17 kilometres from its mouth to the head of the fjord, where the charming town, with the same name stands, sheltered by Mt. Strandartindur and Mt. Bjolfur. Seydisfjordur is considered one of Iceland’s most picturesque towns, because of its stunning natural scenery and its historic wooden buildings. What makes the surroundings even more striking is the river Fjarðará that cascades from the edges of the heath above in beautiful waterfalls.

The route from Egilsstadir to Seydisfjordur only takes around 30 minutes and is especially beautiful. The scenery while driving down the heath, along the river and towards the fjord is absolutely striking and one of the most beautiful roads on Iceland.

The town of Seydisfjordur is impressive, not only because of the surrounding nature but also because in few other places in Iceland has a community of old wood houses been preserved as well as here. The town’s establishment owes its origins to Danish merchants that started trading in the fjord during the mid 19th century. It is, however, the Icelandic herring fishery by Norwegians that is the most significant factor in the growth of the town from 1870-1900. During this time a number of herring fishing facilities were build and in the matter of years, the small community grew into a vibrant fishing town.

Today the town of Seydisfjordur inhabits around 700 people. The economy is mainly based on fisheries, but tourism also plays a crucial role. It seems that the striking landscapes surrounding the town attract more and more visitors each year. Norræna ferry plies between continental Europe and Iceland every week all year round. Tourism in Seydisfjordur has developed with a focus on history, art and culture. Despite the town being small, it is known for it’s thriving art scene. The surroundings of Seydisfjordur also offers excellent hiking routes, a small but quality ski area, a golf course and of course a local swimming hall.

WHAT TO DO IN SEYÐISFJÖRÐUR?

seydisfjordur-lungaLungA is an annual festival held in mid-July in Seydisfjordur. It is an art festival for young people and truly brings the town to life. Young people gather for a week to explore, invent and experience various art forms. It creates a unique vibe when the art forms are melted together and when the young people from all over the world unite in Seydisfjordur through their creativity. The festival ends off with a celebration with exhibitions, interactive performances, and concerts.
seydisfjordur-skaftfellSkaftfell operates in the field of contemporary art, on a local and international level and its aim is to nurture and exhibit visual art. Its activities are based on exhibitions and events, alongside the residency and education program. It serves as a meeting point for artists and locals  and is the main center for visual arts in East Iceland. It was founded in 1998 by a group of art enthusiasts in Seydisfjorudur. In the past decade, Skaftfell has hosted a large number of exhibitions by international, national and local artists and serves an important role in the area as a centre of information and education on art and art related subjects. Every year it organises various seminars with art students in collaboration with the Icelandic Academy of Arts and other educational institutions. In 2013, Skaftfell received an Icelandic award, Eyrarrosin, for outstanding cultural leadership in a rural area.
seydisfjordur-technicalThe Technical Museum of East Iceland was established in 1984 and focuses on the influx of modern times from 1880 – 1950. All kinds of technical innovations in mechanics, electricity, communications, telephony, commerce and architecture are interlaced with changes in lifestyle. Exhibitions seek to recreate the atmosphere of the times they portray. The museum also serves as a research centre and teaching facility for all levels of educations, and the staff members carry out various independent research projects relating to the museum’s area of interest.